We will work for you..
to Sign up for the TOEFL and IELTS exams
We will work for you..
By issuing study and tourist visas
We will work for you..
By issuing study and tourist visas
We will work for you..
By issuing study and tourist visas
We will work for you..
By issuing study and tourist visas
We will work for you..
By issuing study and tourist visas
We will work for you..
By issuing study and tourist visas
We will work for you..
By issuing study and tourist visas

Higher education in Canada

 Canada is a major education-exporting country with a well-funded system of higher education. Its degrees and certificates are respected around the world.

 Surprisingly, Canada has been lagging behind other Western nations in attracting international students. In response, the government recently decided to channel additional federal funds to improve the country’s strategic position in the higher-education market.

 So, expect to hear more soon about education in Canada.

Here’s how it works

  • Take note of two interesting features: Canada has a high standard of living, a unique cultural mosaic, and two official languages—French and English. Many Canadian universities accept research papers, theses and dissertations written in either official language, and some institutions accept them in other languages, as well.
  • Unlike the United States, Canada has no “accreditation body” that oversees the universities. Instead, the ministry of education of each province grants the degrees. Although the federal government sets national educational policy, it shares jurisdiction with the provinces, which manage that policy in the manner they see fit.
  • This means that the laws and regulations that govern academic and vocational programs differ markedly from region to region.

Here’s how it works

  • Bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees are normally granted by universities. Colleges offer vocational programs, in which it grants diplomas and certificates. However, there are certain variations to this division that should be kept in mind.
  • For example, Quebec’s higher education begins with a two- to three-year college (CEGEP-level) programs that lead to admission to a university or a professional program. These programs directly prepares students for either the labor market or university.
  • Bachelor’s degrees in Quebec take three instead of the four-year cycle required by other provinces. Three-year programs are being phased out elsewhere, especially in the richest province, Ontario.
  • But higher education in Ontario also happens to be the best-funded and its tuition the lowest in the country. The Atlantic provinces, on the other hand, have the least funded universities, and some of them rely almost completely on private donors.

How it works

  • International students must obtain an official letter of admission from a recognized educational institution before they can be granted a study permit, which they normally receive on entry into the country. The only exception to this rule is if you plan to attend a one-term course or a study period lasting no more than six months.
  • Therefore, it’s important to submit your application and any accompanying personal documents well in advance of the normal deadline.
  • Many international students also apply for temporary work permits in order to gain valuable work experience and to establish contacts. Full-time students need no special permit for campus employment; permits are issued only to those with an internship as a component of their academic program.

Here are some links on this site, by geographical region